Dialog the false narrative

Dialoging the False Narrative

Over the past several months, we’ve been inundated with the discussion of “fake news”.  Information blatantly false or without basic underlying evidence which is repeated as news.  The irony is that the more frequently people repeat it, the more it is believed.  No one looks for any underlying truth. 

If we are honest, we’ve been dealing with fake news for years.  I’ve called it the false narrative.  Lots of people call it “the inner critic” or “monkey mind”.  It is the headline that blazes across our inner vision when we try something new or reach the boundary of our comfort zone.  It may be something we’ve heard since childhood, or seen repeatedly in the media, or read in a magazine.  It focuses on something within us that must be fixed before we can be whole and attain any level of happiness or success.  Often we go years without questioning these headlines!  “You can’t”  “It’s impossible” “Get a __________ (job, education, relationship, house, car, etc)”  The fix may relate to our size, shape, color, lover, way we talk, way we walk (or don’t walk).  It can be any of a gazillion (don’t bother looking it up, it’s a big number) ways we try to make others and, ultimately ourselves, seem less than whole. 

The real news here is that the wholeness we are trying to fix our way towards already exists.  We are born with our eternally whole self within, waiting for us to recognize and claim it.  Our inner knowing waits for us to stop trying to fix the outside to make the inner whole and instead, draw on the inner whole to heal and transform the outside conditions we desire to change.  Notice I said, “we desire to change” not “the conditions others expect us to change.”  What is it you truly desire?  When we take our focus off of “things” (house, car, job, relationship) and focus on conditions (being peaceful, wise, loving), we might discover what we seek is right there inside our eternally whole self.  

One practice I find helpful is to dialog with the false narrative.  Whatever the message is, get curious in your dialog.  “Why is that so?”  “Is that really true?”  “When did I begin to believe that” (It is interesting how we internalize the false narrative and begin to believe it.)  Then begin to offer alternative messages.  Some people think affirmations, or positive statements, are just new-agey nonsense.  Affirmations are simply an alternative to the negative statements we embrace without question.  In the movie The Help, the maid or nanny teaches the little girl three statements, “You is smart; you is kind; you is important.”  These were just statements as an antidote to the messages the mother was carelessly instilling in the child. Why not use positive statements to replace the false narrative you allow to play on endless loop inside your head?  You are filled with wisdom; you are love in expression and you are the unique pattern of humanity only you can fulfill.  What are you waiting for?  Begin a dialog with your false narrative.   

Image description: blurry background with white lettering: It’s not your job to like me-it’s mine. Byron Katie

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