Reflections on diversity: blue jays

When I first had a backyard bird feeder, years ago, I found blue jays honestly quite annoying.  They were big birds and often spilled seed on the ground in their attempt to balance on the feeder.  They displaced the smaller birds. They were loud and their call strident.  The quiet chirps of chickadees and finches were lost in the cacophony of jays. 

The tiny cup of seeds I can now maintain on my apartment patio doesn’t accommodate as many birds.  Recently, I find the crew mainly softly dull, brown sparrows.  By sheer numbers, they bully my cardinals.  The chickadees and finches have been dissuaded from approaching the crowded cup.  I find that I am excited if a blue jay lands in the pine tree next to the car out front or I hear one down at the mail boxes. The bright blue color and strident call is a promise of something new on the patio.

I am learning to appreciate that embracing diversity means not only welcoming an array of colors but also voices.  We need the soft and harmonious and the loud and strident.  We learn from each. The Creator designed infinite variety for a reason and for me, did not distinguish one superior to the other. Whether race or ability or gender identity or sexual orientation: the beauty of diversity is all our differences, not just the differences we like the best or are most comfortable with.   

Image description: a bright blue bird on a yellowish branch. A dark eye stands out against white feathers and a tuft of blue feathers tops the head. Black and white markings appear on tail and wing feathers.

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